Living Cities Design Competition

Bend, Oregon

In early 2011, Stacey and Rachel participated in a design competition arranged by the International Living Future Institute, and sponsored by Bend 2030. A local team consisting of long-range planners, architects, and students quickly formed. In three short weeks, a vision of what the High Desert could look like if it went ‘Deep Green’ took shape in the form of several before-and-after images, metrics, research and identifying the focus area, known as a transect.

 

The design team identified 27 strategies that could be implemented over time, The strategies and scenario are captured in a simple, iconic formula: C<R. The notion is that a Living City’s consumption must always be less than available resources, utilizing those resources with maximum possible efficiency – as would any living organism. C<R is reflected in our scenario’s graphical visualizations, and serves as a metric and metaphor for its systems diagrams – both quantitative and qualitative.

 

The design visualizes Bend as a Living City, and imagines what it could become, constrained only by the laws of nature, available technology and limits of imagination. These ideas have the potential to be more than a visionary exercise, but a real and vital contributor to the positive, lasting, deeply sustainable evolution of Bend, Oregon. From 81 submissions from around the world, team's entry made it into the final juried round of 30 at the 2011 Living Future Conference in Vancouver, BC.

 

The scenario is rooted in and built upon the reality of Bend today – its climate and vegetation, its resources both abundant and scarce, its history, culture, spirit and aspirations. It recognizes the city’s strengths and weaknesses, as well as its opportunities and constraints. While some of its concepts may seem utopian, they are grounded in reality and technical feasibility.

 

Seven metric boards were included in the competition, including Site, Water, Energy, Materials, Health, Beauty, and Unity - called ‘Petals’ in the Living Building Challenge guidelines. Each ‘petal’ was addressed in detail, both in research and calculations, with ways to implement sustainable strategies to create a Living City. The "Deep Green High Desert" team consisted of Stacey Stemach, Rachel Stemach, Steven Ames, Garrett Kroll, and Allison Meyer.

541.647.5661

550 SW Industrial Way, Suite 135

Bend, Oregon 97702

Living Cities Design Competition

In early 2011, Stacey and Rachel participated in a design competition arranged by the International Living Future Institute, and sponsored by Bend 2030. A local team consisting of long-range planners, architects, and students quickly formed. In three short weeks, a vision of what the High Desert could look like if it went ‘Deep Green’ took shape in the form of several before-and-after images, metrics, research and identifying the focus area, known as a transect.

 

The design team identified 27 strategies that could be implemented over time, The strategies and scenario are captured in a simple, iconic formula: C<R. The notion is that a Living City’s consumption must always be less than available resources, utilizing those resources with maximum possible efficiency – as would any living organism. C<R is reflected in our scenario’s graphical visualizations, and serves as a metric and metaphor for its systems diagrams – both quantitative and qualitative.

 

The design visualizes Bend as a Living City, and imagines what it could become, constrained only by the laws of nature, available technology and limits of imagination. These ideas have the potential to be more than a visionary exercise, but a real and vital contributor to the positive, lasting, deeply sustainable evolution of Bend, Oregon. From 81 submissions from around the world, team's entry made it into the final juried round of 30 at the 2011 Living Future Conference in Vancouver, BC.

 

The scenario is rooted in and built upon the reality of Bend today – its climate and vegetation, its resources both abundant and scarce, its history, culture, spirit and aspirations. It recognizes the city’s strengths and weaknesses, as well as its opportunities and constraints. While some of its concepts may seem utopian, they are grounded in reality and technical feasibility.

 

Seven metric boards were included in the competition, including Site, Water, Energy, Materials, Health, Beauty, and Unity - called ‘Petals’ in the Living Building Challenge guidelines. Each ‘petal’ was addressed in detail, both in research and calculations, with ways to implement sustainable strategies to create a Living City. The "Deep Green High Desert" team consisted of Stacey Stemach, Rachel Stemach, Steven Ames, Garrett Kroll, and Allison Meyer.